Monday, November 26, 2012

Tutorial: Lining Knitwear

Last year I made Miss Natalie a Christmas stocking based on a Jennifer Hoel's Falling Snow Stocking from Ravelry. I modified it a fair amount, including adding a lining. I took lots of pictures and recorded the steps so I could recreate it when niece/nephew number 2 came along, and now I've decided to share those steps here, as the Christmas season looms.

These steps could be used to line any kind of knitwear, with little to no modifications.

Lining Knitwear 

Supplies: 
- Fabric
- Sewing machine (or other means)

I went with a basic quilters cotton for the fabric. I went ahead and got a yard to ensure I had enough, but could have gotten by with less.

Block knitting to desired size and lay flat on top of fabric.

Trace a line about 1/2 - 3/4 inch from the edge of the knitwear. Then add another 1/4 inch seam allowance and cut out 2 pieces.

Fold over and press a line at the top edge so that when you have it in the stocking and folded over, it lines up just under the knitting's "hem". Unfold the fabric before you sew the sides together, you just want to get the line pressed in this step.

Sew the two pieces of fabric together, right-sides (sides with the print) facing.

Trim any excess fabric you might have so that there’s about 1/4 inch seam allowance. Cut silts to the sewn edge on the curves, about every couple of inches. This will help the shaping when it’s flipped inside out.

Put the lining as is inside of your stocking. Then, turn the whole thing inside out so that the right-side of the fabric is on the outside and the right-side of the knitting is on the inside.

Fold top the extra top bit of fabric and pin it just under the Latvian Plait braid stitches, using the line you pressed before sewing.

Sew the two layers together, positioning it so that you’re sewing on top of the purl bumps under the braid. You should pull the knitting as taunt as the fabric will allow. If you machine sew it, have the knitting side up, otherwise your feeders will have a field day with the yarn. 

If all goes well, when left to do it’s own thing, the braid should hide your stitches. 

Fin.